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Fresh Corn Chowder
Fresh Corn Chowder
By Jamie Stolper @ 15:20 :: 6698 Views :: 191 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Dairy, Vegetarian
This recipe is adapted from one in Mollie Katzen's cookbook classic The Enchanted Broccoli Forest (Ten Speed Press, 1982, new edition 1995), a treasure of vegetarian recipes. It is thick and rich and brimming with vegetables and flavor. You can substitute milk for the cream (or evaporated milk, as does Mollie) if you'd like a thinner soup. Use Sweet Corn, Tomato, and Basil Broth for stock, instead of water, and you will be well rewarded. This is absolutely fantastic, as a first course or entrée!
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French Onion Soup
French Onion Soup
By Sue Friedman @ 15:19 :: 10420 Views :: 296 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Dairy, Pareve

The following recipe is best if made with either Vidalia onions (when in season) or large, yellow Bermuda onions. It’s fun to serve this soup in individual ovenproof crock-pots. I like to top it off with melted Gruyere, but any variety of Swiss cheese works well. This recipe is relatively fast to prepare even though it has so many ingredients … just be prepared for teary eyes!

 

Food Editor's Notes:

Onion soup is typically prepared with beef broth. As the laws of kashruth do not permit meat and dairy products to be eaten together, I have substituted vegetable broth for the beef broth. I use the vegetable broth recipe from The New Basics Cookbook (by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins, Workman Publishing, 1989). It is rich and flavorful, low in salt, and substitutes easily in any recipe calling for chicken or beef stock. Because it has lots of pepper in it already, I do not add the ground pepper called for in the soup recipe, except at the end to taste. My family loves this soup, especially my 8-year-old, who will eat it for breakfast, lunch, dinner, or snack!

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Fish Soup St. Tropez
Fish Soup St. Tropez
By Arlene R. Remz @ 15:18 :: 6269 Views :: 170 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Fish

Every winter I make an enormous batch of the vegetable stock for this soup and freeze it. It becomes one of my "quick and easy" dinners: with some fish and a loaf of bread, I have a well-balanced meal in 5 minutes.

Food Editor’s Note: This soup is fantastic, more a stew really, with big chunks of fish and lots of colorful vegetables floating around in the hearty stock. It is quite spicy, however, so if your family isn’t a fan of "hot" foods, I would reduce the crushed red pepper to 1/4 teaspoon. For the fish, I use a combination of cod and halibut, but the choice is yours. I had the fish boned and skinned at the market and I took it all home to add to the broth. Secure the bones and skin in cheesecloth tied with string and just drop it in the pot when you add the water and wine. They will add extra flavor to the soup and you can remove them easily at the end by lifting out the cheesecloth and discarding.

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Fish Fillets with Savory Stuffing
Fish Fillets with Savory Stuffing
By @ 15:17 :: 144719 Views :: 0 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Fish, Holidays
Fish Fillets with Savory Stuffing
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Fish Fillets, Oven-Fried
Fish Fillets, Oven-Fried
By @ 15:16 :: 72135 Views :: 0 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Fish, Holidays

This is an easier and healthier version of traditional deep-fried fish. It is quite delicious too - the outside becomes crispy and the fish itself remains moist. Try this as a main course during Chanukah, when dishes made with oil remind us of the Temple oil that lasted eight days. Serve with Sweet Potato Fries for an extra special treat.

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Fish Chowder (Dairy)
Fish Chowder (Dairy)
By Jamie Stolper @ 15:14 :: 15779 Views :: 784 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Fish, Dairy
I have tried several fish chowder recipes, but this is my favorite – a basic chowder brimming with fish and vegetables, fit for a main course as well as an appetizer. I like a thick chowder, but you can substitute milk for some or all of the cream if you prefer a thinner soup. This recipe is adapted from one contributed by Ruth Kotlier to Specialty of the House, a cookbook put together in the mid-seventies by the Sisterhood of Temple Israel in Boston.
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Eggplant Roll-Ups
Eggplant Roll-Ups
By Norene Gilletz @ 15:10 :: 4408 Views :: 178 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Holidays, Vegetarian

Eggplant replaces pasta in this simple and delicious vegetarian dish.  Great for brunch!  And what a delicious dairy dish for Passover!  If Parmesan cheese is not available, omit it.  Fresh spinach can be used if frozen is not available.  Wash it well, drain and cook covered for 2 to 3 minutes.  Drain and squeeze dry.

Food Editor's Note:  This recipe got rave reviews from our taste-testers!  I loved it and would make it any time, although it is particularly good for Passover as it has no breading or pasta.  It is healthy, low-carb, easier to make than you think, and can be prepared ahead and cooked or reheated when a delicious vegetarian entrée (or even side dish) is needed.  I used a 1 1/2 pound eggplant and got 10 rolls (12 slices).  There was plenty of room in the 9 by 13 casserole, so you could use a smaller dish if you'd like, or even double the recipe.  I used marinara sauce from a jar, but you could definitely use home-made sauce if you're up to it.  (I also used 2% milk and regular cheeses, not low-fat!)  I wasn't sure what "pressed dry non-fat cottage cheese" was, so I just used regular cottage cheese and squeezed out the liquid using cheesecloth.  I later asked Norene if this was a product in Canada, where she lives, and this was her response:  "Pressed cottage cheese is similar to your dry cottage cheese that is smooth like cream cheese. You might call it farmer’s cheese or hoop cheese. Otherwise, drain cottage cheese by squeezing it in cheesecloth or putting it in a strainer. We use a product called “dry cottage cheese” which is like cream cheese but lower in fat and a bit more crumbly. All are interchangeable but the fat content and moisture content differ."

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Egg-Lemon Soup (Avgolemeno)
Egg-Lemon Soup (Avgolemeno)
By Jamie Stolper @ 15:08 :: 6371 Views :: 177 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses
I have always wanted to make Egg-Lemon Soup, a Mediterranean staple, as this is one of the few soups that all the members of my family enjoy.  Chicken soup disappears very quickly in my home, however, so my plans to attempt this always fell through for lack of the basic ingredient.  With a goal of creating a sephardic high holiday menu for ShalomBoston.com, however, I made a batch of chicken stock one evening and the next day, when my husband and sons took off to visit relatives, I stayed behind to test egg-lemon soups and other dishes, one of my favorite parts of my job here at ShalomBoston.com.  I tried several recipes, with different amounts of rice, eggs, and lemon, and this version, just mildly lemon-flavored, was the most preferred by my family upon their return.  It is very easy, and I will definitely make it again.  For a heartier soup, reserve some of the chicken meat used in making the stock and add it at the end of the cooking.
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Creme Brulee French Toast
Creme Brulee French Toast
By Amy Silverstein @ 14:58 :: 9149 Views :: 287 Comments :: :: All, Desserts, Entrees / Main Courses, Holidays

Just a few notes on the recipe:  It is an adaptation of a recipe in The Kosher Palette (Joseph Kushner Hebrew Academy/Kushner Yeshiva High School, Livingston, New Jersey).  The original recipe calls for the challah slices to be placed directly in the baking dish.  Because I was feeding a crowd, I cut the challah slices into cubes to make it easier both to serve and to eat.  Also, I didn’t have the Grand Marnier called for in the original recipe, so I substituted Amaretto.  If you cook this about 8-10 minutes longer than specified, the caramel gets darker and a bit crunchier.  I like it this way and discovered this version because I got distracted and left it in the oven too long!  My son likes it soft and cooked as indicated in the recipe.  I recently cooked and served three dishes of this French toast to a crowd for a Sunday brunch.  On Thursday I cubed the bread and kept it in the fridge in a plastic bag.  On Friday, I prepared the caramel mixture, poured it into the dishes, and put them in the fridge, covered, overnight.  Saturday night I prepared the egg mixture, poured it over the bread, and again stored it in the fridge overnight.  All I had to do on Sunday morning was take it out of the fridge and pop it in the oven.  I loved the fact that the different steps could be spread out, minimizing the last-minute crunch.

Food Editor’s Notes:  Amy is my sister-in-law, and I tasted this wonderful dish at a brunch at her home the day after my nephew’s bar mitzvah.  All the guests raved about it and asked for the recipe, including me.  It turns out that Amy’s version is based on a recipe in one of my favorite cookbooks, The Kosher Palette, which was given me by my dear friend and amazing cook Adele Bacow.  Amy adapted it for the brunch by cutting the challah into cubes instead of using the slices as is.  When I made this at my home, I made some further changes (not incorporated below).  First of all, I was making this at the last minute, so I didn’t let the challah soak in the egg mixture overnight – I just poured it over and popped it in the oven.  Second, I didn’t bother to trim the crusts off the challah.  Third, because the original version was a bit on the sweet side for me, I used an extra slice of challah which, together with the crusts left intact, provided more bread for the same amount of “sweet.”  Also, I thought I had both Grand Marnier and Amaretto, but in fact had neither, so I just used a teaspoon of orange extract in its place.  The end result was beautiful and delicious, a perfect dish for a special breakfast or brunch.  All of which goes to show that this recipe is incredibly easy and foolproof.  When the final product comes out of the oven, it is puffed up to about three times the height of the baking dish (be sure to remove the racks on top before baking) and looks absolutely smashing.  Time it to be done when people are sitting at the table or just lining up for the buffet and you will get loads of “oohs” and “aahs” as you present this dish.  It sinks quickly, but will still taste marvelous

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Cranberry Brisket
Cranberry Brisket
By Arlene Levin @ 14:52 :: 33336 Views :: 2491 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays, Passover
Food Editor’s Note:  I had a delicious brisket made with cranberry sauce one year on Chanukah at my cousin Sue Ellyn’s, but never did get the recipe.  So when my friend Sue Friedman told me she had the best, easiest recipe for brisket ever, made with just two extra ingredients including cranberry sauce, I saw this as my chance to get a great recipe for ShalomBoston.com.  Sue got this from her friend Arlene Levin and says that it’s her favorite “so easy it’s embarrassing” recipe!  Try it for yourself and I’m sure you’ll agree.

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